Sixteen distinct emerging contaminants were found in the Hudson Valley's drinking water, according to a new report.

According to the New York Public Interest Research Group, new data found there are emerging contaminants in New York's drinking water systems.

"New York is renowned for having high quality drinking water and an abundance of fresh water. The public has the basic expectation that when they go to turn on the tap, the water will be safe to drink. But due to a number of emerging threats, particularly chemicals from a post-industrial legacy, this basic expectation has been jeopardized," the report states.

Long Island had the most water systems with detections, followed closely by the Hudson Valley, according to the New York Public Interest Research Group report.

Sixteen distinct emerging contaminants were detected in public water systems in the Hudson Valley, according to the report. Strontium was detected most frequently, followed closely by chromium6. Orange and Westchester Counties had the highest number of systems with detections. 1,4-dioxane was detected in four Hudson Valley counties. PFOA and PFOS were detected in Orange County.

For more information about the contaminants found near your home, CLICK HERE to review the full report.