You see the planes taking off and landing all the time as you drive down Backus Avenue, Miry Brook Road, or when you're heading to or leaving the Danbury Fair Mall.

But did you ever wonder what it looks like to actually be inside a plane landing at Danbury Airport? Today we take you inside the cockpit of a few different private planes landing on some of the different runways at Danbury Airport.

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Danbury Airport is considered by many pilots to be one of the most challenging small Airports in the country to land. According to aopa.org, obstacles include antenna towers and mountainous terrain. The Airport also sits in a valley that brings fog and wind sheer conditions. Pilots experience high terrain immediately south of the airport and obstructions close in on several approaches. The approach to the north requires flying through a gap in the hilltops, and the approach to the west features high terrain and light towers within 1/2 mile of the runway. To say it's a piece of cake to land here would be an understatement.

Before you check out the view from the cockpit, here's a little history of the airport. Back in 1928, local pilots purchased a 60-acre tract near the Danbury Fairgrounds, known as Tucker's Field. This property was leased to the town in 1930 and became the Danbury Municipal Airport.

So what's it really like to land at one of the most challenging small airports in the country? Here's your chance to find out from the view of the pilot.

Each of the videos below show the cockpit perspective of these three different runway landings -- enjoy.

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